3 years ago#1
JeTamme Derouet
Champion
Blogs: 31
Forum: 1,253
Votes: 27

So yea,... I just read Georgia Hale's book "Charlie Chaplin Intimate Close-ups", and I am left with the overwhelming feeling that she spent much of her life with Chaplin either stoned, stupid, or outright delusional.

Thoughts anyone?

JeT!

Answer
3 years ago#2
Mxx
Gold Member
Blogs: 1
Forum: 177
Votes: 2

Been meaning to get that book! Would you recommend it to someone who is much interested in his personal life? Especially from when it is coming from another persons view
Mxx

Reply
3 years ago#3
JeTamme Derouet
Champion
Blogs: 31
Forum: 1,253
Votes: 27

Mxx,

Good question. My initial reaction upon reading it was that I was literally outraged. I'm not sure why. I think I was angry with her for being such an idiot when it came to her undying love and devotion to Charlie, and this may have blinded me to some of the interesting facts. I'm going to reread it this week and get back to you. Fair enough?

I will bait you with this one small detail. Apparently Chaplin had a bird for awhile named "Pet" who would great him every evening when he came home with "Hello Charlie!". I had never heard that story before, not even from his son, who in his book was so candid about the details of his father's home life, and I confess I was quite charmed by it.




Sincerely,
JeT

Reply
3 years ago#4
Mxx
Gold Member
Blogs: 1
Forum: 177
Votes: 2

Have just ordered it this evening, give me about a week and I will give you a verdict!
Had no idea about the parrot, had a look about on the internet but only found a picture from around 1928 of him with one.
Mxx

Reply
3 years ago#5
JeTamme Derouet
Champion
Blogs: 31
Forum: 1,253
Votes: 27

WOW!!!! Thanks so much! You always come up with the most unique Chaplin pics!!!!!! You're going to have to send me some of those websites.

JeT

Reply
3 years ago#6
JeTamme Derouet
Champion
Blogs: 31
Forum: 1,253
Votes: 27

WOW!!!! Thanks so much! You always come up with the most unique Chaplin pics!!!!!! You're going to have to send me some of those websites.

JeT

Reply
3 years ago#7
Mxx
Gold Member
Blogs: 1
Forum: 177
Votes: 2

Ok, have finished the book.
To be honest...I am not sure how to take it. She does seemed to be rather delusional throughout the book, and the way it all ended just seemed all to fictional for my liking. However I did like how it showed Charlies mood swings, and how she used the different 'Little Tramp', 'Mr Chaplin' and 'Charlie' depending on what mood he was in at the time.
Not my favourite book, but still an enjoyable read
Mxx

Reply
3 years ago#8
JeTamme Derouet
Champion
Blogs: 31
Forum: 1,253
Votes: 27

Mxx,

I agree with you across the board. I didn't want to give you my opinion before you read it yourself, because I wanted to see if you came away with the same as me, but I have to tell you that when I first read it, once I read the last sentence, I closed the book and threw it with anger across the room, and it slid down the wall to the floor where it sat for another three days. I couldn't bare to look at it again.

Like you, I hated that whole dream sequins at the end, but more than that, the dream sequins showed just how delusional this chic was. Did you notice how shocked she was just before that to hear that he was married to Oona????? Keeping in mind that he and Oona (not to mention him and the whole Joan Berry thing was splashed across the front page of the newspaper every day). She was so shocked, she had to go to bed for days????? Whatever!!!!!

That's my point. I wasn't disappointed that she never mentioned a single word about any lovemaking her and Chaplin might have had, so much as I was shocked that from the time she and Chaplin hooked up, it seems like to her, no other woman was ever in the picture. SHe leaves out Louise Brooks, Paulette Goodard, Marian Davis, and of course Joan Berry and Oona O'Niel, along with a string of others.

To me she was a doormat for Chaplin, and more than any of the other women, seemed to be in outright denial no matter how badly he treated her. I was angry with her for being so stupid where Chaplin was concerned.

And then I re thought it. Eventually I realized that maybe she wasn't as much of a victim as I'd originally thought. After all, this was a very unhappy young girl who as a child, saw Chaplin on the screen, and for the first time in her life she found happiness. So she made a plan right then and there to get to Hollywood any way she could, then find a way to get into the movies so that she would then meet Charlie Chaplin (her hero), and then make him love her too. This was her only clear thought even as a child the first time she saw him on screen. And you know what? She went on to do every bit of that and more.

When I realized this, I suddenly saw Georgia Hale as a hero. And in many ways she was the perfect example of the message the little tramp was trying to send out to all of us, that no matter how terrible or tragic our life is, that we should find out what makes us happy and leave no stone un turned in trying to make that dream a reality.

Georgia Hale had lived a terrible life as a child, but somewhere in the darkness she saw a funny little man on a movie screen that made her want to lift herself from her own troubles and reach out from the darkness for her rainbow dreams. Once she found him, she went on to live a life with him that seemed to make her happy, even if in sheer delusion. Then she hung on to that dream through all of his **** and against all odds until the bitter end when he finally married Oona and she could no longer hold on,..and of course she finally broke. At that point, I believe she had a nervous breakdown that had less to do with Chaplin but more to do with her own dreams and disappointments.But I can't honestly say she failed. After all, what sad life would she have had if she hadn't followed her dream?

I also believe that's why he hung on to her, returning to her time after time between and within other relationships. I think he saw the tramp in her more than anyone he had ever met, and he loved that about her. And after all, how could he break the heart of the little tramp? How could anyone? That's why I believe he agreed to talk to her when he returned to Hollywood in 1972. I don't think he was ever truly in love with her, but he must have thought her precious, as she (in real life), truly embodied everything that his little tramp Character was about.


So yea I hated her at first, for being so stupid and so delusional,and for being such a doormat,...And I hated her for pointing out his imperfections to me, ones I know in my aching heart are true. Still, I don't like to think of this part of him "Mr. Chaplin". It made me sick at my stomach as though I had been in denial of this part of him for all these years until this moment. Now who lives in Denial where Chaplin's concerned, Georgia? Or me?

In the end, she was the one in her story that I drew my strength and courage from. The one who perhaps even Chaplin himself secretly drew his strength and courage from in this, some of the darkest, most turbulent days of his career and life.

Thoughts?

JeT!

Reply
3 years ago#9
Mxx
Gold Member
Blogs: 1
Forum: 177
Votes: 2

JeT, you seemed to have taken the words straight from my mouth (although yours seems to exceed my way of putting it!)

For me after the first few chapters I really did admire Georgia, what with her family life and all of that. How she found all this hope almost in Chaplin to really go forward in life really touched me.

It was just nearer the end I became annoyed with how she, as you perfectly put it, became this doormat for him and seemed to be stuck in this delusional world that someday they will live happily ever after, oblivious to his temper and how he treated her at times. I almost wanted to jump back in time and just tell her to stop!

As for the dream ending, well...that completely ruined it for me and I too threw it down on the coffee table. If any of my friends wish to borrow the book then I might just tell them to avoid that part altogether.

Mxx

Reply
By entering this site you declare you read and agreed to its Terms, Rules & Privacy and you understand that your use of the site's content is made at your own risk and responsibility.
Copyright © 2006 - 2015 Charlie Chaplin Club